Plastics - how can we reduce them?

Consultation has concluded

5 April 2019

Let's talk about how we can reduce the use of plastic in our community. The rubbish in this photo was collected from Woodman Point in January 2018.

Following the shopping bag ban and a growing number of Councils changing laws aimed at reducing single use plastic waste, what can we do in the City of Cockburn to reduce our use of disposable plastic?

The City has drafted a Wastewise policy for events and now wants your feedback by 5 April 2019.

Background

Such plastics include bottles, cigarette butts, straws, cutlery, cups, balloons, packaging and bags which are designed to be used once, before disposal. Plastics are made from a non-renewable resource and designed to last a lifetime, but are often used for only minutes before being thrown away.

We've looked across Australia at what other local governments and communities have achieved. A number of councils have banned single use plastic items, including the cities of Brisbane and Darebin. In 2018, the City of Bayswater and Town of Bassendean have limited the use of single use plastics at events.

Though some balloons are made of latex rubber instead of plastic, they can also take many months to break down in the environment. In 2018, the Town of Cottesloe was the first council in WA to ban the release of helium balloons via an amendment to a local law. A number of other WA Councils have introduced policies and guidelines limiting the use or release of balloons.

Preliminary consultation was undertaken by the City of Cockburn in September 2018 to gather community feedback on how the City should address the issue of single use plastics. Subsequently, the policy was drafted.

Have your say

  • Attend Coogee Live this weekend 9-10 March, which is a wastewise event
  • Send an email to comment@cockburn.wa.gov.au
  • Complete the survey and poll below
  • Phone Waste Education Officer Nicki Ledger on 94113444.

Thank you for your input!

5 April 2019

Let's talk about how we can reduce the use of plastic in our community. The rubbish in this photo was collected from Woodman Point in January 2018.

Following the shopping bag ban and a growing number of Councils changing laws aimed at reducing single use plastic waste, what can we do in the City of Cockburn to reduce our use of disposable plastic?

The City has drafted a Wastewise policy for events and now wants your feedback by 5 April 2019.

Background

Such plastics include bottles, cigarette butts, straws, cutlery, cups, balloons, packaging and bags which are designed to be used once, before disposal. Plastics are made from a non-renewable resource and designed to last a lifetime, but are often used for only minutes before being thrown away.

We've looked across Australia at what other local governments and communities have achieved. A number of councils have banned single use plastic items, including the cities of Brisbane and Darebin. In 2018, the City of Bayswater and Town of Bassendean have limited the use of single use plastics at events.

Though some balloons are made of latex rubber instead of plastic, they can also take many months to break down in the environment. In 2018, the Town of Cottesloe was the first council in WA to ban the release of helium balloons via an amendment to a local law. A number of other WA Councils have introduced policies and guidelines limiting the use or release of balloons.

Preliminary consultation was undertaken by the City of Cockburn in September 2018 to gather community feedback on how the City should address the issue of single use plastics. Subsequently, the policy was drafted.

Have your say

  • Attend Coogee Live this weekend 9-10 March, which is a wastewise event
  • Send an email to comment@cockburn.wa.gov.au
  • Complete the survey and poll below
  • Phone Waste Education Officer Nicki Ledger on 94113444.

Thank you for your input!

  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.

    Thank you for helping refine our approach to minimising waste

    Thank you for helping refine our approach to minimising waste

    Consultation has concluded