Should the Shark Barrier Stay at Coogee Beach?

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Consultation has concluded


Background

Three years ago, the City of Cockburn installed the State’s first Eco Shark Barrier at Coogee Beach for a three-year trial, allowing people to enjoy a safe swimming environment all year round. The physical barrier is recyclable and safe for marine animals and the environment. The area has become a popular and safe swimming destination for people from around Perth.

  • The barrier is 300 metres long and 75 metres wide.
  • It costs about $100,000 a year to lease.
  • It extends from seabed to surface and creates a safe swimming beach.
  • It is a strong physical barrier made from a sturdy flexible nylon with steel cables.
  • It is expected to last at least 10 years and can be recycled at the end of its life.
  • The barrier does not harm marine life but provides a unique marine habitat while it is in place.
  • It has proven to be a popular destination for swimmers from all around Perth.
  • It attracts school students and other swimming groups.
  • During summer months, one of the City's three pontoons remains in the barrier, providing a source of entertainment for swimmers.

Have Your Say

Now that the three-year trial is about to end in November 2017, the City seeks your feedback about whether the barrier should stay or go?

Please vote in our online poll below and/or leave a comment by Friday 30 June 2017.


Background

Three years ago, the City of Cockburn installed the State’s first Eco Shark Barrier at Coogee Beach for a three-year trial, allowing people to enjoy a safe swimming environment all year round. The physical barrier is recyclable and safe for marine animals and the environment. The area has become a popular and safe swimming destination for people from around Perth.

  • The barrier is 300 metres long and 75 metres wide.
  • It costs about $100,000 a year to lease.
  • It extends from seabed to surface and creates a safe swimming beach.
  • It is a strong physical barrier made from a sturdy flexible nylon with steel cables.
  • It is expected to last at least 10 years and can be recycled at the end of its life.
  • The barrier does not harm marine life but provides a unique marine habitat while it is in place.
  • It has proven to be a popular destination for swimmers from all around Perth.
  • It attracts school students and other swimming groups.
  • During summer months, one of the City's three pontoons remains in the barrier, providing a source of entertainment for swimmers.

Have Your Say

Now that the three-year trial is about to end in November 2017, the City seeks your feedback about whether the barrier should stay or go?

Please vote in our online poll below and/or leave a comment by Friday 30 June 2017.

Consultation has concluded
  • Project Update: June 2017

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    Thank you for your feedback. In total, 3,651 people voted on the issue and 150 people contributed comments.

    A total of 3,608 people voted to retain the eco shark barrier, while 43 people voted to remove it.

    A summary of the consultation findings is found here.

  • Regarding the shark barrier, what information is available on marine life entangled and killed in it? And what use is it in winter?

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    by deanie,
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    No marine life has been tangled in or injured by the barrier. It is made of plastic and covers 15,000 square metres. The barrier has shown that it actually provides additional habitat for a range of marine creatures.

    Many people still swim in the barrier in winter, particularly those who do triathlons. The fish still congregate and use the structure too.