Wyola Tugboat Wreck - will be retained at its current location.

Consultation has concluded

We asked:

The City asked for your feedback about the safety of the Wyola Wreck and nearby barge on the beach at North Coogee. Consultation closed on Friday 17 February 2017.

You said:

About 200 submissions have been received. Thankyou for your input.

We did:

Council considered the matter at its 9 March 2017 meeting and, based on community feedback, decided to retain the wreck at its current location and draft a plan to manage it.

Consultation results:


Retain wreck on beach
Remove wreck from beach

Neutral

Safety concern

Not a safety concern

Facebook (53 responses)

49

4


2

2

Survey (153 responses)
111 happy if it stayed
99 don’t want it removed
28 unhappy if it stayed
47 want it removed

6

50

100

WA Museum

1





Maritime archaeologists

2




2

Coogee Beach Progress Assn

1


1


Horse trainers

2


2


Council landscape architect

1




1

Cockburn historical society

1


1


Aboriginal Reference Group

No action in dunes



Journalist/publisher

1


1


South Beach Community Group


1

1



Background:

Naval records show the tug was among 624 brought into service during World War One. Wyola was taken over by the Commonwealth Board of Shipping on March 28, 1918, and sailed to the Mediterranean on April 13 under the command of Captain Milner. The tug was based at Malta and its role was most likely clearing harbours and shipping lanes of wartime wreckage from the war. This continued until Wyola’s return to Fremantle on January 25, 1920, and was given back to the Swan River Shipping Company in March.

Captain Carl Douglas of East Fremantle took command of the Wyola for 36 years.

The wreck and barge have long been an attraction to tourists and locals, however they have been eroded by the weather and coastal movement. A management strategy is needed to determine its future.

Should we recommend the removal and relocation of the wreck ensuring that any project includes wreck conservation and the development of interpretation opportunities as key components to the wreck’s relocation?

SS Wyola was a steam tug built in 1912 in England for the Swan River Shipping Company of Western Australia. She was 38m long with a 7.5m beam, a depth of 4m and a draught of 4.3m. Her 1,200 horsepower triple-expansion engine gave Wyola a speed of 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h). She was fitted with a strong salvage pump, making her one of the most powerful tugs in Australia.

She completed some remarkable rescues over several decades:

  • While being delivered to Fremantle, Wyola was sent to rescue the barque Concordia, which had been grounded by a cyclone that hit Depuch Island in early 1912.

  • On 13 June 1920 Wyola sailed from Fremantle Harbour into a storm to rescue the steamship Kingsmere, which lost her rudder crossing the Great Australian Bight.

  • On 5 January 1921 Wyola arrived in Carnarvon to rescue the steamship Kwinana, which was on fire. The tug's crew sank Kwinana in shallow water at her moorings to extinguish the fire, and then raised her by pumping her out with the tug's pump.

In 1933, Wyola underwent repairs on the Fremantle slips, when some of her plates were so worn that a hole was accidentally knocked through one. In 1970, Wyola was sold to Goldfield Metal Traders for scrapping. They took the tug to Robb Jetty, where they moored a barge alongside and cut the vessel down. In the process, they moved Wyola up on to the shoreline for further work until only the keel, part of the sternpost and the stern frames remained. These features are still present today.

This section of beach is used daily by trainers exercising horses, dog walkers and other beach users.


We asked:

The City asked for your feedback about the safety of the Wyola Wreck and nearby barge on the beach at North Coogee. Consultation closed on Friday 17 February 2017.

You said:

About 200 submissions have been received. Thankyou for your input.

We did:

Council considered the matter at its 9 March 2017 meeting and, based on community feedback, decided to retain the wreck at its current location and draft a plan to manage it.

Consultation results:


Retain wreck on beach
Remove wreck from beach

Neutral

Safety concern

Not a safety concern

Facebook (53 responses)

49

4


2

2

Survey (153 responses)
111 happy if it stayed
99 don’t want it removed
28 unhappy if it stayed
47 want it removed

6

50

100

WA Museum

1





Maritime archaeologists

2




2

Coogee Beach Progress Assn

1


1


Horse trainers

2


2


Council landscape architect

1




1

Cockburn historical society

1


1


Aboriginal Reference Group

No action in dunes



Journalist/publisher

1


1


South Beach Community Group


1

1



Background:

Naval records show the tug was among 624 brought into service during World War One. Wyola was taken over by the Commonwealth Board of Shipping on March 28, 1918, and sailed to the Mediterranean on April 13 under the command of Captain Milner. The tug was based at Malta and its role was most likely clearing harbours and shipping lanes of wartime wreckage from the war. This continued until Wyola’s return to Fremantle on January 25, 1920, and was given back to the Swan River Shipping Company in March.

Captain Carl Douglas of East Fremantle took command of the Wyola for 36 years.

The wreck and barge have long been an attraction to tourists and locals, however they have been eroded by the weather and coastal movement. A management strategy is needed to determine its future.

Should we recommend the removal and relocation of the wreck ensuring that any project includes wreck conservation and the development of interpretation opportunities as key components to the wreck’s relocation?

SS Wyola was a steam tug built in 1912 in England for the Swan River Shipping Company of Western Australia. She was 38m long with a 7.5m beam, a depth of 4m and a draught of 4.3m. Her 1,200 horsepower triple-expansion engine gave Wyola a speed of 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h). She was fitted with a strong salvage pump, making her one of the most powerful tugs in Australia.

She completed some remarkable rescues over several decades:

  • While being delivered to Fremantle, Wyola was sent to rescue the barque Concordia, which had been grounded by a cyclone that hit Depuch Island in early 1912.

  • On 13 June 1920 Wyola sailed from Fremantle Harbour into a storm to rescue the steamship Kingsmere, which lost her rudder crossing the Great Australian Bight.

  • On 5 January 1921 Wyola arrived in Carnarvon to rescue the steamship Kwinana, which was on fire. The tug's crew sank Kwinana in shallow water at her moorings to extinguish the fire, and then raised her by pumping her out with the tug's pump.

In 1933, Wyola underwent repairs on the Fremantle slips, when some of her plates were so worn that a hole was accidentally knocked through one. In 1970, Wyola was sold to Goldfield Metal Traders for scrapping. They took the tug to Robb Jetty, where they moored a barge alongside and cut the vessel down. In the process, they moved Wyola up on to the shoreline for further work until only the keel, part of the sternpost and the stern frames remained. These features are still present today.

This section of beach is used daily by trainers exercising horses, dog walkers and other beach users.


  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.

    Thankyou for providing comment about the Wyola Wreck.

    Thankyou for providing comment about the Wyola Wreck.

    Consultation has concluded